Allan Kardec returns to the Spirit-world by Anna Blackwell

Having suffered for many years from heart-disease, Allan Kardec drew up, in 1869, the plan of a new spiritist organization that should carry on the work of propagandism after his death. In order to assure its existence, by giving to it a legal and commercial status, he determined to make it a regularly constituted joint-stock limited liability publishing and bookselling company, to be constituted for a period of ninety-nine years, with power to buy and sell, to issue stock, to receive donations and bequests, etc. To this society, which was to be called “The Joint Stock Company for the Continuation of the Works of Allan Kardec,” he intended to bequeath the copyright of his spiritist writings and of the Revue Spirite.

But Allan Kardec was not destined to witness the realization of the project in which he took so deep an interest, and which has since been carried out with entire exactitude by his widow.

On the 31st of March 1869, having just finished drawing up the constitution and rules of the society that was to take the place from which he foresaw that he would soon be removed, he was seated in his usual chair at his study-table, in his rooms in the Rue Sainte Anne, in the act of tying up a bundle of papers, when his busy life was suddenly brought to an end by the rupture of the aneurysm from which he had so long suffered. His passage from the earth to the spirit-world, with which he had so closely identified himself, was instantaneous, painless, without a sigh or a tremor; a most peaceful falling asleep and reawaking, a fit ending of such a life.

His remains were interred in the Cimetière du Père Lachaise, in presence of a great concourse of friends, many hundreds of whom assemble there every year, on the anniversary of his decease, when a few commemorative words are spoken, and fresh flowers and wreaths, as is usual in Continental graveyards, are laid upon his tomb.

It is impossible to ascertain with any exactness the number of those who have adopted the views set forth by Allan Kardec; estimated by themselves at many millions, they are incontestably very numerous. The periodicals devoted to the advocacy of these views in various countries already number over forty, and new ones are constantly appearing. The death of Allan Kardec has not slackened the acceptance of the views set forth by him, and which are believed by those who hold them to be the basis, but the basis only, of the new development of religious truth predicted by Christ; the beginning of the promised revelation of “many things” that have been “kept hidden since the foundation of the world,” and for the knowledge of which the human race was “not ready” at the time of that prediction.

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